Project Advisor(s)

Dr. Robert Tallitsch

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Location

III-C-2: Hanson 305

Disciplines

Biology | Music Therapy

Description, Abstract, or Artist's Statement

Worldwide, statistics suggest that by the year 2050 as many as 80 million individuals will be living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Because current pharmacological interventions can only slow its progression, the pathology eventually overcomes the benefits of the medications, thus leaving a deficit in long-term treatment. However, the preservation of the brain’s ability to work with and benefit from music has created a window of opportunity for an alternative treatment. Music therapy has been shown to be a promising alternative treatment because it has very little risk, and studies suggest that it is effective in improving familiarity and recollection in individuals with AD. This research proposal aims to question the relationship between familiarity and recognition through the use of active music therapy, and hypothesizes that music therapy can strengthen voice familiarity and therefore improve family recognition.

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May 6th, 1:00 PM May 6th, 2:00 PM

Alzheimer's Disease and the Importance of Music Therapy

III-C-2: Hanson 305

Worldwide, statistics suggest that by the year 2050 as many as 80 million individuals will be living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Because current pharmacological interventions can only slow its progression, the pathology eventually overcomes the benefits of the medications, thus leaving a deficit in long-term treatment. However, the preservation of the brain’s ability to work with and benefit from music has created a window of opportunity for an alternative treatment. Music therapy has been shown to be a promising alternative treatment because it has very little risk, and studies suggest that it is effective in improving familiarity and recollection in individuals with AD. This research proposal aims to question the relationship between familiarity and recognition through the use of active music therapy, and hypothesizes that music therapy can strengthen voice familiarity and therefore improve family recognition.