Project Advisor(s)

Dr. Tierney Brosius, Dr. Michael Reisner

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Disciplines

Biology | Entomology

Description, Abstract, or Artist's Statement

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Copleoptera: Buprestidae) is a destructive colonizer of ash trees that arrived in the United States in 2002. Since then, EAB has been detected in 22 states and two Canadian provinces, and has proven to be a complicated management issue for many cities including Rock Island. The purpose of this study was to determine the spatial distribution and density of the EAB infestation in Rock Island, Ill and to identify potential correlations between host larval densities and visual symptoms. A continuation of spatial distribution was determined through a tree survey examining specific species of Ash trees, canopy health, and epicormic shoots in conjunction with the City of Rock Island Public Works. All information collected was sent to ArcGIS electronically through an iPhone Application (Collector App) and later analyzed the use of GIS (Geographic Information System).Larval density and potential correlations with visual symptoms were determined by removing two 50cm branch segments from ash trees. Branch segments were whittled in 1mm thick sheets until the cambium was reached while recording the number of larvae and galleries. Visual symptoms including ash canopy rating, bark splitting, epicormic shooting and exit holes were assessed for each tree used in the trapping survey and branch sampling. No EAB beetles were found outside the invasion epicenter at Hasselroth Park in Rock Island, Ill. Similarly to the data that was collected (last Summer of 2014), the larval density in sampled branches was insignificant, concluding that there were no significant relationships between larval density and the presence of any visual symptoms.

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The Spatial Distribution and Density of the Emerald Ash Borer Infestation in Rock Island and Moline, IL

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Copleoptera: Buprestidae) is a destructive colonizer of ash trees that arrived in the United States in 2002. Since then, EAB has been detected in 22 states and two Canadian provinces, and has proven to be a complicated management issue for many cities including Rock Island. The purpose of this study was to determine the spatial distribution and density of the EAB infestation in Rock Island, Ill and to identify potential correlations between host larval densities and visual symptoms. A continuation of spatial distribution was determined through a tree survey examining specific species of Ash trees, canopy health, and epicormic shoots in conjunction with the City of Rock Island Public Works. All information collected was sent to ArcGIS electronically through an iPhone Application (Collector App) and later analyzed the use of GIS (Geographic Information System).Larval density and potential correlations with visual symptoms were determined by removing two 50cm branch segments from ash trees. Branch segments were whittled in 1mm thick sheets until the cambium was reached while recording the number of larvae and galleries. Visual symptoms including ash canopy rating, bark splitting, epicormic shooting and exit holes were assessed for each tree used in the trapping survey and branch sampling. No EAB beetles were found outside the invasion epicenter at Hasselroth Park in Rock Island, Ill. Similarly to the data that was collected (last Summer of 2014), the larval density in sampled branches was insignificant, concluding that there were no significant relationships between larval density and the presence of any visual symptoms.