Project Advisor(s)

Dr. Bohdan Dziadyk

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Disciplines

Botany | Plant Biology

Description, Abstract, or Artist's Statement

Wisconsin Fast Plant (Brassica rapa, Brassicaceae) seeds were planted in three, six-celled planting containers filled with potting soil and put beneath a continuous grow-lux light. One week after sprouting, one container (E1) was put into a separate tray filled with 0.5% NaCl solution, another container (E2) was put into a separate tray filled with 1.0% NaCl solution, and the third container was left in regular tap water. At seven-day intervals thereafter, the height of all plants was recorded, and the numbers of leaves and flowers were recorded. By week four of recording data, the average height (mm) of the control plants was 166.5, 97.7 in the E1 plants, and 71.6 in the E2 plants. The t-test for height of the control plants vs. the height of the E1 plants was significant (p=0.00067). Similarly, the t-test for the control plants vs. E2 plants was highly significant (p=0.00003). The height of E1 plants vs. E2 plants was also significant (p=0.00834). That same week, the average number of leaves for control plants was 2.86, for E1 plants was 2.36, and for E2 plants was 2.00. The average number of flowers for control plants that week was 2.50, for E1 plants was 2.14, and for E2 plants was 2.31. Our hypothesis that higher salinity hinders plant growth, flower production and leaf production was fully supported. We infer that fast plants and other herbaceous species may have a lower tolerance of salinity compared to that of woody plants.

Share

COinS
 

The Effects of Two Levels of Salinity on Wisconsin Fast Plants

Wisconsin Fast Plant (Brassica rapa, Brassicaceae) seeds were planted in three, six-celled planting containers filled with potting soil and put beneath a continuous grow-lux light. One week after sprouting, one container (E1) was put into a separate tray filled with 0.5% NaCl solution, another container (E2) was put into a separate tray filled with 1.0% NaCl solution, and the third container was left in regular tap water. At seven-day intervals thereafter, the height of all plants was recorded, and the numbers of leaves and flowers were recorded. By week four of recording data, the average height (mm) of the control plants was 166.5, 97.7 in the E1 plants, and 71.6 in the E2 plants. The t-test for height of the control plants vs. the height of the E1 plants was significant (p=0.00067). Similarly, the t-test for the control plants vs. E2 plants was highly significant (p=0.00003). The height of E1 plants vs. E2 plants was also significant (p=0.00834). That same week, the average number of leaves for control plants was 2.86, for E1 plants was 2.36, and for E2 plants was 2.00. The average number of flowers for control plants that week was 2.50, for E1 plants was 2.14, and for E2 plants was 2.31. Our hypothesis that higher salinity hinders plant growth, flower production and leaf production was fully supported. We infer that fast plants and other herbaceous species may have a lower tolerance of salinity compared to that of woody plants.