Project Advisor(s)

Dr. Megan Quinn, Dr. Peter Xiao, Dr. Vickie Phipps

Presentation Type

Visual Arts Exhibit

Disciplines

Arts and Humanities | Ceramic Arts

Description, Abstract, or Artist's Statement

Art is intimate and involves closeness and understanding with one’s self as well as the materials. As a ceramic artist, I aim to capture emotions and experiences that are personal yet universal, and beckon the viewer to come closer. I combine wheel throwing with hand building aspects to create something unique and showcase the skills I have developed. Wheel thrown pieces have a symmetrical beauty to them that is difficult to achieve with hand building. Hand construction has a complex nature that allows the maker to improvise and change over a series of days rather than mere minutes at a wheel. Because of the combination of these practices, I am able to capture a particular style of form that expresses variation with static tension in an aesthetically pleasing way. The forms I have created provide a range of visual representations focusing on the idea of circulating motion. I could not resist the urge to make smaller, more compact forms when wheel throwing, as they require one to engage in close proximity. My goal is to capture the contradictory aspects of fluid and finite clay. As humans, we are always balancing constant change with the permanence of our decisions. I hope to spark a sense of new experience and interest in viewers while also holding a sense of familiarity through human experiences.

Comments

This is part of the Senior Inquiry presentations for art majors. It should be held in the Augustana gallery.

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Senior Art Show

Art is intimate and involves closeness and understanding with one’s self as well as the materials. As a ceramic artist, I aim to capture emotions and experiences that are personal yet universal, and beckon the viewer to come closer. I combine wheel throwing with hand building aspects to create something unique and showcase the skills I have developed. Wheel thrown pieces have a symmetrical beauty to them that is difficult to achieve with hand building. Hand construction has a complex nature that allows the maker to improvise and change over a series of days rather than mere minutes at a wheel. Because of the combination of these practices, I am able to capture a particular style of form that expresses variation with static tension in an aesthetically pleasing way. The forms I have created provide a range of visual representations focusing on the idea of circulating motion. I could not resist the urge to make smaller, more compact forms when wheel throwing, as they require one to engage in close proximity. My goal is to capture the contradictory aspects of fluid and finite clay. As humans, we are always balancing constant change with the permanence of our decisions. I hope to spark a sense of new experience and interest in viewers while also holding a sense of familiarity through human experiences.