Project Advisor(s) (Students Only)

Dr. J Austin Williamson

Presentation Type (All Applicants)

Poster Presentation

Disciplines (All Applicants)

Psychology

Description, Abstract, or Artist's Statement

The current study will examine how socioeconomic status affects perceived social support and coping strategies and how these two factors affect stress levels and post traumatic growth. This could lead to developments in how to better educate people on the most effective ways to deal with stress and providing community resources to populations particularly vulnerable to stress. Perceived social support and coping have been shown to affect post-traumatic growth and stress. Differences in coping strategies and availability of support may be partly driven by an individual's socioeconomic status. Perceived social support is defined as the extent to which someone believes support is available to them. Coping strategies can be defined in various ways, but for this study they will be separated into two categories: proactive and reactive. Proactive coping are strategies taken before a stressor begins; while reactive coping are strategies taken after a stressor has begun.

First, we hypothesize that people cope differently depending on their socioeconomic status. Generally what we have found about coping and socioeconomic status is that individuals with higher socioeconomic status are more likely to employ proactive coping strategies than those with low socioeconomic status.

Second, we propose that individuals with different levels of socioeconomic statuses will have varying levels of perceived social support. We believe that individuals with higher socioeconomic statuses may perceive that they have higher levels of social support available to them in time of need.

The purpose of this study is to examine how socioeconomic status influences perceived social support alongside proactive and reactive coping strategies and how those two factors affect post-traumatic growth and stress levels, mediated by the type of stressor.

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Avoidant Coping Mediates the Relationship between Socioeconomic Status and Stress

The current study will examine how socioeconomic status affects perceived social support and coping strategies and how these two factors affect stress levels and post traumatic growth. This could lead to developments in how to better educate people on the most effective ways to deal with stress and providing community resources to populations particularly vulnerable to stress. Perceived social support and coping have been shown to affect post-traumatic growth and stress. Differences in coping strategies and availability of support may be partly driven by an individual's socioeconomic status. Perceived social support is defined as the extent to which someone believes support is available to them. Coping strategies can be defined in various ways, but for this study they will be separated into two categories: proactive and reactive. Proactive coping are strategies taken before a stressor begins; while reactive coping are strategies taken after a stressor has begun.

First, we hypothesize that people cope differently depending on their socioeconomic status. Generally what we have found about coping and socioeconomic status is that individuals with higher socioeconomic status are more likely to employ proactive coping strategies than those with low socioeconomic status.

Second, we propose that individuals with different levels of socioeconomic statuses will have varying levels of perceived social support. We believe that individuals with higher socioeconomic statuses may perceive that they have higher levels of social support available to them in time of need.

The purpose of this study is to examine how socioeconomic status influences perceived social support alongside proactive and reactive coping strategies and how those two factors affect post-traumatic growth and stress levels, mediated by the type of stressor.